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Publications in 2004




  1. Aerts, D. and Aerts. S. (2004). Towards a general operational and realistic framework for quantum mechanics and relativity theory. In A. C. Elitzur, S. Dolev and N. Kolenda (Eds.), Quo Vadis Quantum Mechanics? Possible Developments in Quantum Theory in the 21st Century (pp. 153-208). New York: Springer.

    Abstract: We propose a general operational and realistic framework for a theory that generalizes quantum mechanics and relativity theory such that both appear as special cases of this new theory. Our framework is operational, in the sense that all aspects are introduced making specific reference to events to be experienced, and realistic, which means that it takes seriously the hypothesis of an independent existing reality. To come to this framework we present a detailed study of standard quantum mechanics within the axiomatic approach to quantum mechanics, more specifically the Geneva-Brussels approach, identifying two of the traditional 6 axioms as 'failing axioms'. We prove that these two failing axioms are at the origin of the impossibility for standard quantum mechanics to describe a continuous change from quantum to classical and hence its inability to describe macroscopic physical reality, and that these same two axioms are also at the origin of the impossibility for standard quantum mechanics to deliver a model for the compound entity of two 'separated' quantum entities. We put forward that replacing the two failing axioms is a necessity to built a theory that can contain standard quantum mechanics as well as relativity theory as a special case. Next we analyze the nature of the quantum probability model and show that it can be interpreted as the consequence of the presence of a lack of knowledge on the interaction between the measurement apparatus and the physical entity under consideration. These two insights, the failing axioms and the nature of quantum probability, give rise to a very specific view on the quantum phenomenon of nonlocality. Nonlocality should be interpreted as nonspatiality. This means that an entity in a nonlocal state, like for example the typical EPR state, is 'not inside space'. As a consequence space is no longer the all embracing theatre of reality, but a structure that has emerged together with the macroscopic material entities that have emerged from the microworld. This clarifies why general relativity theory cannot be used as a basis for the elaboration of the new generalized theory, since in general relativity theory the set of events is taken a priori to be the time-space continuum. Hence in general relativity theory time-space is a basic structure considered to capture all of reality. In our framework we introduce 'happenings' and the 'set of happenings' constituting reality. A happening is however not identified with a point of time-space, as this is the case for an events of general relativity theory. We analyze different aspects of the new framework, and list the most important problems to be investigated for an elaboration of this framework into a workable and as complete as possible theory.

  2. Aerts, D. and Czachor, M. (2004). Quantum aspects of semantic analysis and symbolic artificial intelligence. Journal of Physics A-Mathematical and General, 37, pp. L123-L132. Archive reference and link: http://uk.arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/0309022.

    Abstract:Modern approaches to semantic analysis if reformulated as Hilbert-space problems reveal formal structures known from quantum mechanics. A similar situation is found in distributed representations of cognitive structures developed for the purpose of neural networks. We take a closer look at similarities and differences between the above two fields and quantum information theory.

  3. Aerts, D. and Valckenborgh, F. (2004). Failure of standard quantum mechanics for the description of compound quantum entities. International Journal of Theoretical Physics, 43, pp. 251-264.

    Abstract: We reformulate the 'separated quantum entities' theorem, i.e.the theorem that proves that two separated quantum entities cannot be described by means of standard quantum mechanics, within the fully elaborated operational Geneva-Brussels approach to quantum axiomatics, where the basic mathematical structure is that of a State Property System. We give arguments that show that the core of this result indicates a failure of standard quantum mechanics, and not just some peculiar shortcoming due to the axiomatic approach to quantum mechanics itself.

  4. Note, N. and Aerts, D. (2004). The perception of the human self: A proposal for ethical adjustment. Differentiation and Integration of Worldviews. International Readings on Theory, History and Philosophy of Culture, 20, pp. 34-57.

    Abstract: The late-modern or post-modern era is facing many challenges. Environmental issues, the fragmentation and moral disintegration of society and increasing levels of aggression have developed into serious problems worldwide. But also the phenomena of alienation and unbridled individual autonomy have been recognised as requiring our attention. In this paper we will set out to argue that at least some of these issues have a common ground for being rooted in today’s perception of the Self. According to this perception, we think of ourselves as essentially ‘self-reliant’ and surrounded by a world that is sheer concrete reality. This has made it possible – though not necessary! – for man to adopt a detached stance towards his social and physical environment and, on the personal level, has led to a decreased meaningfulness of life. In the first part of this article we will try to pinpoint the way in which today’s structuring blocks defining the human being have led man to believe that he is essentially self-reliant, and we will discuss the consequences of this belief. If we are to counteract these socio-political and individual challenges, we will have to move away from such a detached perception i.e. we will have to adjust the very concept of man. In an attempt to make a positive contribution towards a new perception and definition of man’s Self, the second part of this paper suggests a number of (ethical) building blocks that may help achieve this.






1978, 1979, 1980,

1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990,

1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000,

2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010.

2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020.




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Last modified November 5, 2009, by Diederik Aerts