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Publications in 2012




    1. Aerts, D., Broekaert, J., Gabora, L. and Veloz, T. (2012). The guppy effect as interference. Quantum Interaction. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 7620, pp 36-47. download pdf. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-35659-9_4.

      Abstract: People use conjunctions and disjunctions of concepts in ways that violate the rules of classical logic, such as the law of compositionality. Specifically, they overextend conjunctions of concepts, a phenomenon referred to as the Guppy Effect. We build on previous efforts to develop a quantum model that explains the Guppy Effect in terms of interference. Using a well-studied data set with 16 exemplars that exhibit the Guppy Effect, we developed a 17-dimensional complex Hilbert space H that models the data and demonstrates the relationship between overextension and interference. We view the interference effect as, not a logical fallacy on the conjunction, but a signal that out of the two constituent concepts, a new concept has emerged.

    2. Aerts, D., D'Hooghe, B. and Sozzo, S. (2012). A quantum-like approach to the stock market. In M. D'Ariano, S.-M. Fei, E. Haven, B. Hiesmayr, G. Jaeger, A. Khrennikov, J.-A. Larsson (Eds.), Foundations of Probability and Physics - 6, AIP Conference Proceedings, 1424, pp. 495-506. download pdf.

      Abstract: Modern approaches to stock pricing in quantitative finance are typically founded on the 'Black-Scholes model' and the underlying 'random walk hypothesis'. Empirical data indicate that this hypothesis works well in stable situations but, in abrupt transitions such as during an economical crisis, the random walk model fails and alternative descriptions are needed. For this reason, several proposals have been recently forwarded which are based on the formalism of quantum mechanics. In this paper we apply the 'SCoP formalism', elaborated to provide an operational foundation of quantum mechanics, to the stock market. We argue that a stock market is an intrinsically contextual system where agents' decisions globally influence the market system and stocks prices, determining a nonclassical behavior. More specifically, we maintain that a given stock does not generally have a definite value, e.g., a price, but its value is actualized as a consequence of the contextual interactions in the trading process. This contextual influence is responsible of the non-Kolmogorovian quantum-like behavior of the market at a statistical level. Then, we propose a 'sphere model' within our 'hidden measurement formalism' that describes a buying/selling process of a stock and shows that it is intuitively reasonable to assume that the stock has not a definite price until it is traded. This result is relevant in our opinion since it provides a theoretical support to the use of quantum models in finance.

    3. Aerts, D., Czachor, M., Kuna, M., Sinervo, B. and Sozzo, S. (2012). Quantum probabilistuc structures in competing lizard communities. Nature Precedings, hdl:10101/npre.2012.6954.1. download pdf.

      Abstract: Almost two decades of research on the use of the mathematical formalism of quantum theory as a modeling tool for entities and their dynamics in domains different from the micro-world has now firmly shown the systematic appearance of quantum structures in aspects of human behavior and thought, such as in cognitive processes of decision-making, and in the way concepts are combined into sentences. In this paper, we extend this insight to animal behavior showing that a quantum probabilistic structure models the mating competition of three side-blotched lizard morphs. We analyze a set of experimental data collected from 1990 to 2011 on these morphs, whose territorial behavior follows a cyclic rock-paper-scissors (RPS) dynamics. Consequently we prove that a single classical Kolmogorovian space does not exist for the lizard's dynamics, and elaborate an explicit quantum description in Hilbert space faithfully modeling the gathered data. This result is relevant for population dynamics as a whole, since many systems, e.g. the so called plankton paradox situation, are believed to contain elements of cyclic competition.

    4. Aerts, D. and Sozzo, S. (2012). A contextual risk model for the Ellsberg paradox. Journal of Engineering Science and Technology Review, 4, pp. 246-250. download pdf.

      Abstract: The Allais and Ellsberg paradoxes show that the expected utility hypothesis and Savage's Sure-Thing Principle are violated in real life decisions. The popular explanation in terms of 'ambiguity aversion' is not completely accepted. On the other hand, we have recently introduced a notion of 'contextual risk' to mathematically capture what is known as 'ambiguity' in the economics literature. Situations in which contextual risk occurs cannot be modeled by Kolmogorovian classical probabilistic structures, but a non-Kolmogorovian framework with a quantum-like structure is needed. We prove in this paper that the contextual risk approach can be applied to the Ellsberg paradox, and elaborate a 'sphere model' within our 'hidden measurement formalism' which reveals that it is the overall conceptual landscape that is responsible of the disagreement between actual human decisions and the predictions of expected utility theory, which generates the paradox. This result points to the presence of a 'quantum conceptual layer' in human thought which is superposed to the usually assumed 'classical logical layer'.

    5. Aerts, D. and Sozzo, S. (2012). Contextual risk and its relevance in economics. Journal of Engineering Science and Technology Review, 4, pp. 241-245. download pdf.

      Abstract: Uncertainty in economics still poses some fundamental problems illustrated, e.g., by the Allais and Ellsberg paradoxes. To overcome these difficulties, economists have introduced an interesting distinction between 'risk' and 'ambiguity' depending on the existence of a (classical Kolmogorovian) probabilistic structure modeling these uncertainty situations. On the other hand, evidence of everyday life suggests that 'context' plays a fundamental role in human decisions under uncertainty. Moreover, it is well known from physics that any probabilistic structure modeling contextual interactions between entities structurally needs a non-Kolmogorovian quantum-like framework. In this paper we introduce the notion of 'contextual risk' with the aim of modeling a substantial part of the situations in which usually only 'ambiguity' is present. More precisely, we firstly introduce the essentials of an operational formalism called 'the hidden measurement approach' in which probability is introduced as a consequence of fluctuations in the interaction between entities and contexts. Within the hidden measurement approach we propose a 'sphere model' as a mathematical tool for situations in which contextual risk occurs. We show that a probabilistic model of this kind is necessarily non-Kolmogorovian, hence it requires either the formalism of quantum mechanics or a generalization of it. This insight is relevant, for it explains the presence of quantum or, better, quantum-like, structures in economics, as suggested by some authors, and can serve to solve the aforementioned paradoxes.

    6. Aerts, D. and Sozzo, S. (2012). Quantum interference in cognition: Structural aspects of the brain. In V. Ovchinnikov and P. Dini (Eds.), IARIA, Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Quantum, Nano and Micro Technologies, pp. 33-41. download pdf.

      Abstract: We identify the presence of typically quantum effects, namely 'superposition' and 'interference', in what happens when human concepts are combined, and provide a quantum model in complex Hilbert space that represents faithfully experimental data measuring the situation of combining concepts. Our model shows how 'interference of concepts' explains the effects of underextension and overextension when two concepts combine to the disjunction of these two concepts. This result supports our earlier hypothesis that human thought has a superposed two-layered structure, one layer consisting of 'classical logical thought' and a superposed layer consisting of 'quantum conceptual thought'. Possible connections with recent findings of a 'grid-structure' for the brain are analyzed, and influences on the mind/brain relation, and consequences on applied disciplines, such as artificial intelligence and quantum computation, are considered.

    7. Aerts, D. and Sozzo, S. (2012). Quantum Model Theory (QMod): Modeling contextual emergent entangled interfering entities. Quantum Interaction. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 7620, pp 126-137. download pdf. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-35659-9_12.

      Abstract: In this paper we present 'Quantum Model Theory' (QMod), a theory we developed to model entities that entail the typical quantum effects of 'contextuality', 'superposition', 'interference', 'entanglement' and 'emergence'. The aim of QMod is to put forward a theoretical framework that is more general than standard quantum mechanics, in the sense that, for its complex version it only uses this quantum calculus locally, i.e. for each context corresponding to a measurement, and for its real version it does not need the property of 'linearity of the set of states' to model the quantum effect. In this sense, QMod is a generalization of quantum mechanics, similar to how the general relativity manifold mathematical formalism is a generalization of special relativity. We prove by means of a representation theorem that QMod can be used for any entity entailing the typical quantum effects mentioned above. Some examples of application of QMod in concept theory and macroscopic physics are also considered.

    8. Aerts, D. and Sozzo, S. (2012). Entanglement of conceptual entities in Quantum Model Theory (QMod). Quantum Interaction. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 7620, pp 114-125. download pdf. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-35659-9_11.

      Abstract: We have recently elaborated 'Quantum Model Theory' (QMod) to model situations where the quantum effects of contextuality, interference, superposition, entanglement and emergence, appear without the entities giving rise to these situations having necessarily to be of microscopic nature. We have shown that QMod models without introducing linearity for the set of the states. In this paper we prove that QMod, although not using linearity for the state space, provides a method of identification for entangled states and an intuitive explanation for their occurrence. We illustrate this method for entanglement identification with concrete examples.

    9. Aerts, D. and Sozzo, S. (2012). Quantum structure in economics: The Ellsberg paradox. In M. D'Ariano, S.-M. Fei, E. Haven, B. Hiesmayr, G. Jaeger, A. Khrennikov, J.-A. Larsson (Eds.), Foundations of Probability and Physics - 6, AIP Conference Proceedings, 1424, pp. 487-494. download pdf.

      Abstract: The expected utility hypothesis and Savage's Sure-Thing Principle are violated in real life decisions, as shown by the Allais and Ellsberg paradoxes. The popular explanation in terms of ambiguity aversion is not completely accepted. As a consequence, uncertainty is still problematical in economics. To overcome these difficulties a distinction between risk and ambiguity has been introduced which depends on the existence of a Kolmogorovian probabilistic structure modeling these uncertainties. On the other hand, evidence of everyday life suggests that context plays a fundamental role in human decisions under uncertainty. Moreover, it is well known from physics that any probabilistic structure modeling contextual interactions between entities structurally needs a non-Kolmogorovian framework admitting a quantum-like representation. For this reason, we have recently introduced a notion of contextual risk to mathematically capture situations in which ambiguity occurs. We prove in this paper that the contextual risk approach can be applied to the Ellsberg paradox, and elaborate a sphere model within our hidden measurement formalism which reveals that it is the overall conceptual landscape that is responsible of the disagreement between actual human decisions and the predictions of expected utility theory, which generates the paradox. This result points to the presence of a quantum conceptual layer in human thought which is superposed to the usually assumed classical logical layer, and conceptually supports the thesis of several authors suggesting the presence of quantum structure in economics and decision theory.

    10. Aerts, D., Sozzo, S. and Tapia, J. (2012). A quantum model for the Ellsberg and Machina paradoxes. Quantum Interaction. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 7620, pp 48-59. download pdf. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-35659-9_5.

      Abstract: The Ellsberg and Machina paradoxes reveal that expected utility theory is problematical when real subjects take decisions under uncertainty. Suitable generalizations of expected utility exist which attempt to solve the Ellsberg paradox, but none of them provides a satisfactory solution of the Machina paradox. In this paper we elaborate a quantum model in Hilbert space describing the Ellsberg situation and also the Machina situation, and show that we can model the specific aspect of the Machina situation that is unable to be modeled within the existing generalizations of expected utility.

    11. Vanderbeeken, R., Le Roy, F., Stalpaert, C. and Aerts, D. (Eds.), (2011). Drunk on Capitalism: An Interdisciplinary Reflection on Market Economy, Art and Science. Dordrecht: Springer.






1978, 1979, 1980,

1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990,

1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000,

2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010.

2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020.




Chronological     Year by Year     By Subject     Searchable



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Last modified November 5, 2009, by Diederik Aerts