logo

Multilingual service encounters in corona times: communication needs and practices in public service provision contexts


MSCA-2020-Kerremans01

Topic

Brussels Institute for Applied Linguistics

The BIAL research group is concerned with research into multilingual and intercultural transfer. This transfer encompasses the phenomena of circulation, transformation and reinterpretation of linguistic practices and discourses in and across geo-cultural areas and societal contexts. BIAL is interdisciplinary at its core and aligns itself with current developments in Translation Studies, Interpreting Studies, Terminology, Cultural Transfer, Intercultural Communication and Language and Society. 

In light of our focus on the transfer of cultural and linguistic codes, we look into – among other aspects – the modalities of this transfer, the contexts in which the transfer takes place, the underlying processes of the transfer, the instruments that are used, the linguistic objects that result from the transfer, and the actors that are part of the process. We examine the forms, functions and characteristics of translation, interpreting, multilingual practices and discourses from an intercultural perspective, and view them as phenomena that are firmly embedded in historical and/or current social contexts, taking the cultural reciprocity and multidirectionality of (re)transfer into account. This perspective also involves paying attention to the identification of marginal spaces and (networks of) minorities. As such, we wish to investigate the role of translation, interpreting and other communicative practices in the cultural transfer of ideas, ideologies, norms and values. This pursuit entails the recruiting of (historical) language and text criticism, cultural imagery, philosophical ideas, as well as the scientific paradigms within Translation Studies, Interpreting Studies, Terminology, Cultural Transfer, Intercultural Communication and Language and Society.

https://bial.research.vub.be/

 

 

 

 

Human-environment interactions at Hala Sultan Tekke, SE Cyprus: changing landscapes, human impact and sustainability


MSCA-2020-KNys01

Topic

Intermediality and Hybrid Writings in Hispanic Literary Studies


MSCA-2020-DCAstilleja01

Topic

Brussels Platform for Digital Humanities

The Brussels Platform for Digital Humanities (DIGI) is an interdisciplinary research platform aiming to support digitally-enabled research across the Arts and Humanities at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. As such, DIGI engages in the field of 'Digital Humanities' at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, ranging from archaeology and philosophy to linguistics and history. It develops DH collaboration and supports research projects and infrastructure projects across the faculties. 

DIGI brings together and offers guidance to researchers affiliated to the Centre for Linguistics (CLIN) and the Centre for Literary and Intermedial Crossings (CLIC), who use digital techniques for corpus linguistics; to the Centre for Logic and Philosophy of Science (CLWF), where digital tools are used for the study of intellectual history; and to the members of HOST (Historical Research into Urban Transformation Processes), who use linked data, GIS, social network analysis, and text mining in the field of social and economic history.

These research groups have established productive ties with research groups outside of the humanities. At the AI-Lab, novel microservices are currently being developed to delve deeper into the content analysis of text corpora with regards to both ‘distant’ and ‘close’ reading, and new techniques are developed for the application of agent-based modeling in linguistics.

https://digi.research.vub.be/

 

 

 

The Acquisition of Reference and Anaphora Resolution


MSCA-2020-AVandeCasteele01

Topic

Interlanguage Pragmatics and Intercultural Communication


MSCA-2020-AVandeCasteele02

Topic

Discourse markers in Spanish


MSCA-2020-AVandeCasteele03

Topic

Historical Sociolinguistics


MSCA-2020-RVosters01

Topic

Centre for Linguistics (CLIN)

CLIN is part of the Linguistics and Literary Studies department (LIST) within the Faculty of Arts and Philosophy. The main objective of CLIN is to promote research in theoretical and applied linguistics and the application of this research in the wider society. Research at CLIN addresses a broad spectrum of issues related to the structure, use, learning and teaching, impairment, historical development, and the social and political contexts of languages. Recent work includes studies on morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics, dialectology, sociolinguistics, sociohistorical linguistics, bilingualism and bilingual education, aphasia, childhood speech and language disorders, second language acquisition, and methodology and practice in language teaching. Applications of research at CLIN include consultancy for private and public organisations in the areas of language and education policy, curriculum design, language teaching material development, language assessment, speech pathology, and natural language processing. Furthermore, the research centre hosts the Werkgroep Over Taal (WOT), a platform for the collaborative interchange of knowledge via presentations and workshops by international (guest-)speakers covering a wide variety of linguistic topics.

https://clin.research.vub.be/en/about

 

 

 

Intermediality and Hybrid Writings in Hispanic Literary Studies


MSCA-2020-DCAstilleja01

Topic

Postcolonial Literary Studies


MSCA-2020-EBekers01

Topic

Narrating Europe on Page, Stage and Screen


MSCA-2020-JHauthal01

Topic

Intermediality in Contexts of (Post-)Migration


MSCA-2020-JHauthal02

Topic

Centre for Literary and Intermedial Crossings

The Centre for Literary and Intermedial Crossings brings together researchers in the field of literary, theatre and performance studies. 
CLIC offers scholars an interdisciplinary network to stimulate research along three key concepts: Media, Genres and Spaces.

MEDIA
Literature, theatre and performance traditionally belong to specific medial systems. However, these systems often interact in hybrid, intermedial ways. Definitions of intermediality range from a broad view on crossings between distinct media such as literature and theatre, to a more specific focus on the incorporation of one medium in another (e.g. the use of images or documentary material in literary texts). Methodological issues, too, challenge both practitioners and scholars.
 

GENRES
The generic classification systems of literature and media, based on stylistic and structural features, are never neutral or ahistorical categories. They produce and communicate meaning, and also change over time, in response to specific socio-cultural but also political and economic contexts. Authors and artists often consciously renew, transgress or mix genre conventions, and thus influence the reception of literature and theatre. 
 

SPACES
Space has become an ever more influential and highly diversified theoretical category – ranging from the urban space of modernism to the contact zone of postcolonial theory and the rhizomatic network of the megalopolis. Through imaginary topographies and theatrical scenographies, transnational and multilingual identities are negotiated and disputed, as are new forms of politically committed artistic production.

https://clic.research.vub.be/en

 

 

 

 

 

History of Migration, Labour Relations and Social Policy, c. 1500-1914


MSCA-2020-BLambert01

Topic

Transnational Migration Streams in Later Medieval Europe: The Role of the Low Countries


MSCA-2020-BLambert02

Topic

Social inequality and social justice in the early modern world


MSCA-2020-BLambert03

Topic

Historical Research into Urban Transformation Processes (HOST)

Established in 2005, the HOST research group conducts innovative research in the field of urban history, contributing to insights into contemporary societal challenges. Essential to our research is the historical role of cities as catalysts for processes of economic innovation, social exclusion and integration, and political-institutional change. Particular interests include the history of social inequality, migration and economic and social relations, as well as the interactions between these phenomena. 

Our work focuses predominantly on the cities of Brabant and Flanders, two core regions of the Southern Low Countries characterized by high levels of urbanization, commercialization and early industrialization, and by a marked variation in urban structures and profound upswings and downswings in economic development. We study these regions from an international, comparative perspective, which allows us to establish the generality and particularity of the urban developments we observe. Our research covers the period from the later Middle Ages to the nineteenth century. This long-term perspective makes it possible to distinguish between the impact of long-term structural transformations and shorter-term conjunctural effects. 

HOST has over twenty-five permanent members, including professors, post-doctoral researchers and PhD students. Many of our staff are internationally acknowledged researchers with extensive publication records and involvements in both international and nationally-funded research projects. We welcome proposals for Marie Sklodowska Curie-Individual Fellowships from motivated candidates around the topics suggested on this page, but are also open to other ideas that fall within our areas of interest. 

For more information, please visit https://host.research.vub.be/en  

Human-environment interactions at Hala Sultan Tekke, SE Cyprus: changing landscapes, human impact and sustainability


MSCA-2020-KNys01

Topic

Maritime Cultures Research Institute (MARI

The Maritime Cultures Research Institute (MARI) is a fundamental research center that explores how people in or close to a maritime environment created particular ‘fluid’ cultures and societies based on connectivity and transience. Seas and coastal areas, including islands, estuarine and riverine environments, are liminal zones where products, people and ideas are exchanged and transformed. Indeed, traveling the seas connects people and coastal and riverine societies are well known for their ‘access’ to the world, both from the material as well as immaterial point of view. Liminal makes central, so to speak. 

The center investigates the archaeology of maritime cultures and societies, which includes:

  • the comparative study of societal and environmental dynamics, crises and resilience and the interaction between people and landscape
  • the investigation of travels, connections and exchanges;
  • access to and transfers of material culture and (cultural) knowledge.

It also comprises the study of a particular ‘maritime’ sense of place and identity, as well as the particular spaces and environments in which these travels and transactions take place, such as ships and vessels, ports of trade, towns and coastal landscapes.

More on the website.