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VUB research selected as top abstract by the American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy

VUB Research top abstract at American Gene and Cell therapy conference

The work of Prof. Thierry Vandendriessche and Prof. Marinee K.L. Chuah, initiators of the Department of Gene Therapy and Regenerative Medicine at the VUB Faculty of Medicine in Jette, is selected as top abstract at the latest conference The American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy (ASGCT). This international conference has been heralded as one of the key events in gene & cell therapy. 

(Prof. Thierry Vandendriessche 6th from left on the picture, with at his right side Prof. Marinee K.L. Chuah).The field of gene and cell therapy has been gaining momentum in recent years with clear evidence of clinical success for the treatment of genetic diseases. The American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy (ASGCT) is holding its annual conference in Philadelphia between 15-19 May 2012 (http://www.asgct.org/) that highlights the recent progress in this field. Typically, about 2000 delegates from around the world are attending this international conference that has been heralded as one of the key events in gene & cell therapy.

Prof. Thierry VandenDriessche and Prof. Marinee K.L. Chuah have recently established the Department of Gene Therapy and Regenerative Medicine at the Faculty of Medicine in Jette, VUB. Their work was selected as top abstract at this latest ASGCT conference. The awarded research was entitled “De novo design of tissue-specific regulatory elements results in robust transduction in heart and liver: implications for cardiovascular disease and hemophilia”. Their efforts spearheaded several international collaborations with other teams in EU and USA. Prof. VandenDriessche and Prof. Chuah: “We are particularly pleased with this international recognition. It serves as a testimony to the dedication of our team. We would like to express our thanks to the VUB leadership for their support and commitment to make this type of frontline research possible”.  This novel study may foster the development of effective and safe gene therapeutics with broad implications for gene therapy and regenerative medicine.